Creative ways to lose that last pesky poundage when the obesity train is gone!

I am not finding it all that difficult to continue to lose weight, though it has slowed by quite a significant chunk since hitting “one-derland” in December. (One-derland is a term of endearment we formerly 200+ and 300+ pound folks have for being in the 100s)

This week, I’ve taken on all of the hobby farm chores that my wife used to do when I was too disabled to walk, let alone work/get things done/care for the indoor animals. We have 2 geldings (“fixed” male horses) who are quite large, and we keep them in a paddock (natural horse living, no stalls unless it’s for a quick bite of meds or medical care). We also compost their manure (along with our own kitchen scraps compost), turning it into the most richly wormy fertilizer you can imagine.

This comes at the price of $0, but a lot of elbow grease (and a good measure of back and leg grease too)

This is a snippet of my thoughts as I embarked on Day 2 of The Chores (picking manure, dumping manure, setting up hay for 4 feeding times per day, cleaning up the hay nets, preparing the medication/rations for the horses, filling the water trough, as well as caring for myself and the indoor pets).

I am into that “normal” size range, but due to my excess skin, I’m a tweak above “normal” in the BMI range. I think any doctor would consider my 32-inch waist on a 5’9″ woman to be “normal”. I just want to be precise.

Though the months have been short (8 total as of my most recent declaration of health that began at 315 pounds), the lessons have been life-changing.

More to come!

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Creative ways to lose that last pesky poundage when the obesity train is gone!

  1. That is amazing and impressive that you are able to do all those chores now! A testament to your dedication to your physical recovery and wellness.

    Like

    • I am changing how I look at tasks. Instead of looking at them as an “if” I am able, I know I am able, and will just do rather than approach it with trepidation about all of the ways my body is incapable. It’s a competency and a confidence that I wasn’t expecting, and never knew I was lacking with my lifelong battles.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s